There is an apparent divergence from the first generation and second generation diasporic Indian Woman Novelist. The first generation writers such as Anita Desai, Shashi Despande and. Bharathi Mukharjee project the issues of racism, nostalgia, and rootlessness whereas the second generation writers like Jhumpa Lahiri, Kiran Desai and. Manju Kapur attempts to smash the literary and social norms of the prejudiced society. An Indian Diasporic writer such as Anita Desai, Bharati Mukherjee, Shashi Tharoor, Amitav Ghosh, Vikram Seth, Sunetra Gupta, Rohinton Mistry, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Manju Kapur has won the prestigious award for their writings. They describe their encounter in foreign countries. One such experience of Manju Kapur being away from India when she was a student in Canada has portrayed in her novel ‘The Immigrants’
Manju Kapur is one of the renowned contemporary Indian novelists of English literature and whose writings based on transition in a woman. She was an English lecturer in Miranda House, a noninterventionist arts and science college for the woman at Delhi. She was born in Amritsar, a town in the northern Indian state of Punjab and lives in Delhi. She pursued her B.A at Delhi University and did her graduation at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Her major themes are feminism, immigration, identity, isolation, assimilation, and corruption. She plainly focuses on female sexuality, infertility, pre-marital and extramarital affairs in her works. She depicts women who confront a significant challenge in her life and ponders her identity. She exhibits woman passion, mother-daughter love, and man and woman relationship in her writings. She has been criticised for a pessimistic portrayal of Indian men. She has contributed five works to literature namely Difficult Daughters in 1998, A Married Woman in 2002, Home in 2006, The Immigrant in 2008, and Custody in 2011.