Gender discrimination, or also known as gender inequality is a concept that has not just made its appearance only in the 21st century. Making appearance way before that, gender discrimination is a concept that states that males and females are not of equal status. Still being present nowadays, it is through social, economic and cultural situations that gender discrimination is recognized. Presently, it is significantly distinguished that many women are poorly treated compared to males, in situations such as workplaces, sports industry as well as political environments.

Originating from cultures and rituals, the Jewish religion being one of the oldest monotheistic faith, has portrayed gender discrimination through unequal treatment of women. The Jewish faith has greatly evolved over the years allowing women to end their fight to gain freedom. As the world’s population continues to grow, with many religions and faiths evolving, it is important to outline and understand the impacts of gender discrimination towards women, and more specifically, Jewish women.

The question of gender discrimination is one that has peaked my interest. This interest has led me to the research question: How did the concept of intersectionality impact women’s culture in the Jewish faith before the 21st century?

Before the 21st century, most Jewish women were impacted by the concept of intersectionality through the use of gender separation in public settings, such as the synagogue, taking transportation as well as the settings of wedding celebrations. Women’s freedom of marital customs was also greatly affected with being a male’s dominance, under the halakha. Their loss of freedom has also affected their religious court roles, not allowing them to become religious leaders and minimizing their rights on religious practice.