2.1 Love represented as a unifying force
Love requires shared feelings, an assurance of pleasures that nobody and nothing can ever affect. It only exists as long as it is eternal, and those who are truly in love admit that this feeling is flourishing in their hearts being alive beyond the grave too. It is a temple of all of us, a place which always waits a drop of desire, is a path paved to eternity, a long road that involves compromises from both parts and sometimes love goes beyond the power of understanding. The theme of love can be found in all literatures of all time. It is given special importance, as being a fundamental human experience which differs according to the age, sex, social status, belief, historical age or culture. Love is like a wave, it makes you no longer a master of your own life, you have another master which guides you and your decisions. William Shakespeare in Romeo and Juliet seizes this stage of love: Romeo replaces Juliet’s name with “saint”. For Romeo, Juliet is the saint icon and he is the pilgrim who glorifies her.

The love between Romeo and Juliet is as passionate as it is fragile, it is a painting in such a thin cloth that it breaks down to the lightest scratch. It’s a red cloth wrapping the protagonists in death’s mantle long before the end, as a morbid prophecy. Romeo and Juliet die hard but in a special way which makes this death so beautiful and remarkable. Desperate and endless hugs cover Juliet’s soft body. The poetry of death melts into the poetry of love, till the tears spring out of the soul and you have the sensation that pain will last to infinity, that is how it feels the loss of the other, as an infinite pain. In a world like Romeo and Juliet’s, the only right you have is to die opposing the system, and not to love the person you want to.